Friends of PM Press, May 2015 edition

The past few months have been crammed full of good books, but I have been too busy reading them (and working) to update.

This month I received:

  • Signal: 04, edited by Alec Dunn and Josh MacPhee. Signal bills itself as “A Journal of International Political Graphics & Culture.” Articles in this volume cover Palestinian Affairs (a publication of the PLO), large-scale visual interventions by the Bay Area Peace Navy, artistic responses in Juárez, Mexico, to long-term femicide occurring there, the Kotare Trust Poster Archive in New Zeland, Kommune 1, the artist behind the cover art for Three Continents Press, and the Punchclock Print Collective of Toronto.
  • The Big Gay Alphabet Coloring Book, by Jacinta Bunnell & Leela Corman. This is, unsurprisingly, a coloring book. I am not hugely excited by coloring books, but this is a cute resource for those who are. Bunnell is the person also behind the Girls are Not Chicks and Sometimes a Spoon Runs Away With Another Spoon coloring books.
  • Sisters of the Revolution: A Feminist Speculative Fiction Anthology, edited by Ann and Jeff VanderMeer. This came out within a month of Octavia’s Brood from AK Press and I can only hope that it is less of a fluke of publishing and more of an indicator of the reaffirming of the the connection between people who seek to imagine a different world and write about it and those who seek to imagine a different world and enact it. This book is co-published with Geek Radical and was assisted by a 2012 kickstarter, and appears to have been released approximately a year behind schedule. I have enjoyed the bits that I have already read and I excited for this book and the trend in general.

More information about the Friends of PM Press is available here.

Friends of PM Press, September 2014 Edition

This month I received:

  • Abolish Work: “Abolish Restaurants” plus “Work, Community, Politics, War,” by prole.info, co-published with Thought Crime Ink. prole.info’s stuff is probably best summed up as accessible, intense class theory with starkly beautiful illustrations. Even when I don’t agree with their analysis, I’m always impressed with what they put out. I’m not a huge fan of Abolish Restaurants, but I’m glad that the discussion is happening.
  • Blood Lake, by Kenneth Wishnia. This is the fifth, and as of yet, final book in his Filomena Buscarsela mystery series, though I am holding out hope for more. If the previous books are anything to go on, this will almost having me wishing that my commute was longer so that I could keep reading.
  • Burning Britain: The History of UK Punk, 1980- 1984, by Ian Glasper. This book is split into chapters by region, and then within each chapter, broken down by individual bands. It is long and the print is tiny.
  • Who’s Afraid of the Black Blocs?: Anarchy in Action Around the World, by Francis Dupis-Déri, translated by Lazer Lederhendler. Originally published as Les Black Blocs. La liberté st l’égalité se manifestent by Montréal’s Lux Éditeur in 2007, with the first English language edition coming from Between the Lines in Toronto last year. This is currently the definitive book on looking past the “smashy smashy” and into the theory and history of the black bloc.

More information about the Friends of PM Press is available here.

Friends of PM Press, August 2014 Edition

Last month I received: 

  • Black Flags and Windmills: Hope, Anarchy, and the Common Ground Collective, second edition, by Scott Crow, with forewords by Kathleen Cleaver and John P. Clark (the latter is new to the second edition). Here is a written review of the first edition from Center for a Stateless Society and a promo video for the first edition. 
  • Dead Kennedys: Fresh Fruit for Rotting Vegetables, The Early Years, by Alex Ogg, with artwork by Winston Smith and photographs by Ruby Ray. 
  • The System, by Peter Kuper, with an introduction by Calvin Reid. This book is gourgeous. not just the art inside, but the book itself. I have already “read” (since there are no words) some of it, and it is exactly the kind of story about people in a city and the world that I have come to expect from Kuper. Even the blurb from Luc Sante on the back is amazing. 
  • Turning Money into Rebellion: The Unlikely Story of Denmark’s Revolutionary Bank Robbers, edited and translated by Gabriel Kuhn. Original German by Klaus Viehmann. Co-published with Kersplebedeb. This book is about the Blekingegade Group and includes historical documents and interviews with two of the groups long-time members. 

More information about the Friends of PM Press is available here.

Update on NYS Bill A2736

A while ago, I wrote a short post about a piece of legislation in New York that would prevent police and prosecutors from using the presence of condoms as evidence of prostitution. The State Assembly session is almost over and that bill, A2736, still has not been brought to the floor.

Here’s what Red Umbrella Project has to say:

We need help from New Yorkers to get the bill to pass the Assembly before the end of session (which is tomorrow). Here are two calls you can make that really  make a difference. Each will take less than a minute:

Call Speaker Sheldon Silver’s office to urge him to put bill A2736 to a vote on the floor! The number is 518-455-3791

We are confident that we have the votes to pass the bill  once it is on the floor, but we need to MAKE SURE so please call your  Assemblymember and ask them to VOTE YES on A2736! You can find the info  for your Assemblymember here. Call your representative’s Albany office.

I have already made both calls, and I encourage you to do the same. NYC Department Health and Mental Hygiene distributes free condoms all over NYC free of charge. The Center for Disease Control even highlights that program as an example of a structural level intervention. This bill would prevent police and prosecutors in NYC and all over NYS from undoing the work of many government and nonprofit groups across the state.

Friends of PM Press, June 2013 Edition

This weekend I received:

  • Michael Moorcock’s Jerusalem Commands: The Third Volume of the Colonel Pyat Quartet, with a new introduction by Alan Wall. This is a huge work of fiction that I will almost definitly not read, but it does contain a bibliography that is also available here.
  • Towards Collective Liberation: Anti-racist Organizing, Feminist Praxis, and Movement Building Strategy, by Chris Crass, forward by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, introduction by Chris Dixon. It is broken down into five sections: “While Learning from the Past, We Work to Create a New world”: Building the Anarchist Left; “We Make the Road by Walking”: Developing Anti-racist Feminist Praxis; “Because Good Ideas Are Not Enough”: Lessons From Vision-Based, Strategic, Liberation Organizing Praxis; “Love In Our Hearts and Eyes on the Prize”: Lessons from Anti-racist Organizing for Collective Liberation; and the Conclusion.
  • Maroon The Implacable: The Collected Writings of Russell Maroon Shoatz, Edited by Fred Ho and Quincy Saul, Afterword by Matt Meyer and Nozizwe Madlala-Routledge, Forward by Chuck D. Co-published by PM Press and Ecosocialist Horizons. I have been waiting for this book since I went to it’s release event back in early May.  That event made such an impression on me that when the book didn’t arrive in the May package, I called PM Press to ask about to (more on that another day).

More information on Friends of PM Press and why it’s amazing is available on their website.

Friends of PM Press, March 2013 Edition

Today I got:

  • Between Torture and Resistance, by Oscar López Rivera
  • Earth at Risk: Building a a Resistance Movement to Save the Planet, Edited by Derrick Jensen and Lierre Keith, which is a series of interviews with a pretty impressive group of people
  • Bicycle! a Repair and Maintenance Manifesto, 2nd Edition, by Sam Tracy

Friends of PM Press: great way to support a serious reading habit on a budget.